Ambrosia hispida Pursh
  • Soap Bush


Cite taxon page as 'WFO (2021): Ambrosia hispida Pursh. Published on the Internet;http://www.worldfloraonline.org/taxon/wfo-0000137401. Accessed on: 27 Oct 2021'

General Information

Perennials, 10–50(–80+) cm. Stems prostrate or decumbent. Leaves mostly opposite; petioles 5–25 mm; blades rounded-deltate to ovate or elliptic, 20–35+ × 10–30+ mm, 2–3-pinnately lobed, bases cuneate, ultimate margins entire or toothed, abaxial and adaxial faces strigillose. Pistillate heads clustered, proximal to staminates; florets 1. Staminate heads: peduncles 1–2 mm; involucres obliquely cup-shaped, 2–3+ mm diam., strigillose; florets 5–20+. Burs: bodies ± pyriform, 1–2 mm, ± strigillose, spines or tubercles 0–5+, near middles or distal, stoutly conic, 0.1–0.5+ mm, tips straight. 2n = 104.

  • Provided by: [D].Flora of North America @ efloras.org
    • Source: [
    • 1
    • ]. 

    Habit

    Ambrosia hispida is an herbaceous perennial, growing along the ground rarely above 20 cm in height, and typically forming mats. The leaves are arranged oppositely, to 9 cm in length and pinnately compound, dividing 2 or 3 times creating a lacy appearance. The leaflets are lanceolate, with an acuminate leaf apex and deeply serrated leaf margin. The vegetative structures are covered with a hispid pubescence that gives the plant a light green to gray appearance. The incomplete, imperfect, monoecious flowers are arranged in racemes of heads subtended an involucre made of 1 series of phyllaries. The actinomorphic flowers occur in the center of the head, each subtended by a bract. The staminate flowers have 5 sepals, 5 unfused stamens, and a non-functional ovary. The carpellate flowers have no perianth or stamens and a single superior ovary that becomes an achene at maturity. The achenes are covered with pubescence and tubercles.

  • Provided by: [C].Leon Levy Native Plant Preserve
    • Source: [
    • 2
    • ]. 

    Habitat

    Ambrosia hispida grows in sandy Dune areas along shorelines.

  • Provided by: [C].Leon Levy Native Plant Preserve
    • Source: [
    • 2
    • ]. 

    Distribution

    Ambrosia hispida grows on all island groups within the Lucayan Archipelago as well as Florida, the entire Caribbean region, and Mexico south to northern South America.

  • Provided by: [C].Leon Levy Native Plant Preserve
    • Source: [
    • 2
    • ]. 

    Uses

    Ambrosia hispida is widely used in the Bahamas for a variety of illness categories including to treat colds and flu, gastrointestinal issues (increasing appetite, diarrhea, indigestion and vomiting), as well as dermatological problems (blisters and general skin irritation). Elsewhere in the Caribbean it is used to treat worms and high blood pressure.

  • Provided by: [C].Leon Levy Native Plant Preserve
    • Source: [
    • 2
    • ]. 

    Nationally Preferred Names

    NameLanguageCountry
    Soap BushEnglishBS
    WormwoodEnglishBS
    Bay TansyEnglishBS
    Bay GerinaEnglishBS
    Sweet BayEnglishBS

     Information From

    Compositae
    CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0). https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0
    • A CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0).
    Leon Levy Native Plant Preserve
    http://www.levypreserve.org
    Leon Levy Native Plant Preserve. 2020. Flora by Common Name and by Scientific Name. Bahamas National Trust. Available at www.levypreserve.org Accessed on (2020/07/09).
    • B Ethan Freid All rights Preserved
    • C Leon Levy Native Plant Preserve. All rights Preserved
    Flora of North America @ efloras.org
    http://www.efloras.org/flora_page.aspx?flora_id=1
    'Flora of North America @ eFloras (2008). Published on the Internet http://www.efloras.org/flora_page.aspx?flora_id=1 [accessed August 2016]' Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, MO & Harvard University Herbaria, Cambridge, MA.
    • D Flora of North America Association
    World Flora Online consortium
    http://www.worldfloraonline.org/organisation/WFO
    World Flora Online Data. 2018.
    • E CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0).