Solanum obliquum Ruiz & Pav.
  • "R. & Pav., Fl. Peruv. [Ruiz & Pavon] 2: 35, tab. 165, fig. a. 1799., 1799."


Cite taxon page as 'WFO (2020): Solanum obliquum Ruiz & Pav. Published on the Internet;http://www.worldfloraonline.org/taxon/wfo-0001030000. Accessed on: 26 Nov 2020'

General Information

Shrub or small tree 1-10 m tall. Stems moderately to densely puberulent, occasionally also sparsely pilose with eglandular hairs 1-2 mm long.
Sympodial units (3-) 4-foliate.

Inflorescences (1.5-)3-16 cm, unbranched, with (10-) 30-50 flowers, all flowers perfect, the axes densely puberulent (-pilose); peduncle 0.5-3 cm; rachis 0.5-14 cm; pedicels 15-25 mm, 25-30 (-50) mm in fruit, spaced ca. 1 (-4) mm apart, articulated at the base and leaving conspicuous scars on the rachis or occasionally leaving pedicellar remnants up to 1 mm long.
Buds globose, ellipsoidal, or ovoid, acute or obtuse at apex. Flowers with the calyx radius 2-5 mm, the lobes (0.5-) 2-2.5 x (1-) 2.5-3 mm, deltate, apiculate at tips, subcoriaceous, puberulent to pubescent. Corollas 2-2.5 cm in diameter, the radius 10-20 mm, stellate, coriaceous (rarely chartaceous), green with yellow-brown or purplish tinge adaxially, the tube 2-3 mm, the lobes 7-15 x 2-4 mm, narrowly triangular, acute and slightly cucullate at apices, glabrous to moderately puberulent abaxially and adaxially, the margin tomentose to ciliate. Anther thecae 4-5 x 1.5-2 mm, ellipsoidal to oblong, not connivent, white or yellowish, the pores directed abaxially and laterally, occasionally directed distally; connective 4 (-5) x 1-2 mm, oblong, abaxially slightly shorter than thecae at apex, equal to or slightly exceeding them at base, adaxially absent or produced as a swelling ca. 2 mm long and 0.5-1 mm wide, creamy-white. Ovary glabrous; style 4-5 x 0.5-1 mm in diam. at base, ca. 2 mm in diam. at apex, equal to or slightly shorter than the stamens, umbrella-shaped, strongly dilated distally, glabrous; stigma truncate, biglandular.
Fruits (2.5-) 4-4.5 (-7) x (1.5-) 2.5-3.5 cm, globose or ellipsoidal, obtuse at apex, green spotted with white when immature, yellow to orange when mature, glabrous; stone cell aggregates very small.
Seeds 3.5-5 x 3-4 mm, flattened, glabrous to densely pubescent.

  • Provided by: [D].SolanaceaeSource.org
    • Shrub or small tree 1-10 m tall. Stems moderately to densely puberulent, occasionally also sparsely pilose with eglandular hairs 1-2 mm long.
      Sympodial units (3-) 4-foliate.
      Leaves simple, the blades (3-) 5-25 x (2-) 4-25 cm, 1-1.5 (-2) times as long as wide, subcoriaceous, (elliptic to) ovate, glabrescent to moderately puberulent (-pilose) adaxially, more so on veins, densely puberulent (-pilose) abaxially; base cordate, often oblique, with basal lobes (0.5-) 1-5 cm; margin entire; apex acute to acuminate; petioles 0.5-13 cm, densely puberulent and occasionally also sparsely pilose.
      Inflorescences (1.5-)3-16 cm, unbranched, with (10-) 30-50 flowers, all flowers perfect, the axes densely puberulent (-pilose); peduncle 0.5-3 cm; rachis 0.5-14 cm; pedicels 15-25 mm, 25-30 (-50) mm in fruit, spaced ca. 1 (-4) mm apart, articulated at the base and leaving conspicuous scars on the rachis or occasionally leaving pedicellar remnants up to 1 mm long. Buds globose, ellipsoidal, or ovoid, acute or obtuse at apex.
      Flowers with the calyx radius 2-5 mm, the lobes (0.5-) 2-2.5 x (1-) 2.5-3 mm, deltate, apiculate at tips, subcoriaceous, puberulent to pubescent. Corollas 2-2.5 cm in diameter, the radius 10-20 mm, stellate, coriaceous (rarely chartaceous), green with yellow-brown or purplish tinge adaxially, the tube 2-3 mm, the lobes 7-15 x 2-4 mm, narrowly triangular, acute and slightly cucullate at apices, glabrous to moderately puberulent abaxially and adaxially, the margin tomentose to ciliate. Anther thecae 4-5 x 1.5-2 mm, ellipsoidal to oblong, not connivent, white or yellowish, the pores directed abaxially and laterally, occasionally directed distally; connective 4 (-5) x 1-2 mm, oblong, abaxially slightly shorter than thecae at apex, equal to or slightly exceeding them at base, adaxially absent or produced as a swelling ca. 2 mm long and 0.5-1 mm wide, creamy-white. Ovary glabrous; style 4-5 x 0.5-1 mm in diam. at base, ca. 2 mm in diam. at apex, equal to or slightly shorter than the stamens, umbrella-shaped, strongly dilated distally, glabrous; stigma truncate, biglandular.
      Fruits (2.5-) 4-4.5 (-7) x (1.5-) 2.5-3.5 cm, globose or ellipsoidal, obtuse at apex, green spotted with white when immature, yellow to orange when mature, glabrous; stone cell aggregates very small.
      Seeds 3.5-5 x 3-4 mm, flattened, glabrous to densely pubescent

    • Provided by: [D].SolanaceaeSource.org
      • Distribution

        Solanum obliquum occurs in clearings and open places in tropical rain forest, 100-1000(-1850) m in elevation, from the Amazon Valley west to river valleys of eastern Andean slopes in Colombia, Peru, and Brazil.

      • Provided by: [D].SolanaceaeSource.org
        • Solanum obliquum occurs in clearings and open places in tropical rain forest, 100-1000(-1850) m in elevation, from the Amazon Valley west to river valleys of eastern Andean slopes in Colombia, Peru, and Brazil.

        • Provided by: [D].SolanaceaeSource.org
          • Uses

            Peru: asna panga (McDaniel & Rimachi 17800), chupa sacha (Woytkowski 5017), chupo sacha (Bohs & Schunke 2159; Mathias & Taylor 3979; Schunke 1883, 4651, 5866, 6286, 8339); gallinazo panga (Williams 2615, 6762), sihuca sacha (Torres 282), sapohuasca (Quicha; Lewis et al. 11660), tomato del campo (Mexia 8235), yapu iji (Achuar Jívaro; Lewis et al. 12176, 13216).  Brazil: jurubeba (Lemos Froes 20644), tsetsepere (Deni; Prance et al. 16402). 



            Although Plowman & Ramírez (11211) and Mexia (8235) report that the fruits are edible, others say that they are poisonous (Fosberg 28993).  The juice of the leaves and stems is used as an analgesic and sedative for intestinal fever, headaches, rheumatism, kidney ailments, hangovers, muscle aches, and pains of the lower back and stomach (Bohs & Schunke 2159; Mathias & Taylor 3979; Plowman & Schunke 7513; Plowman & Ramírez 11211; Schunke 5866, 6286, 8339; Woytkowski 5017).  The label of Plowman & Schunke 7513 gives a more detailed account of the medicinal preparation of this species.  The leaf is rasped in cold water, lemon juice is added, and the infusion is taken in the morning before breakfast for three days.  Schunke 5866 reports that an infusion is given in an enema to combat the grippe.  Data from Lewis et al. 11660 indicate that the Quichuas of Loreto, Peru, drink an infusion of the crushed leaves to cure malaria.  The Achuar Jívaro of Amazonian Peru scrape the bark into a cold infusion that is used to massage swollen body parts (Lewis et al. 12176).  A poultice of the leaves is also used to massage the skin around a snake bite (Lewis et al. 13236).  In Amazonian Brazil, the leaves are heated in water and used to bathe babies, both to keep them healthy and to cure fever (Prance et al. 16402).

          • Provided by: [D].SolanaceaeSource.org
            • Distribution Map

               
              • Native distribution
              Specimens
              Found in
              • Southern America Brazil Acre
              • Amazonas

                Bibliography

              • 1 R. & Pav., “Fl. Peruv. [Ruiz & Pavon] 2: 35, tab. 165, fig. a. 1799.”, 1799.

               Information From

              Brazilian Flora 2020 project - Projeto Flora do Brasil 2020
              http://floradobrasil.jbrj.gov.br
              Brazil Flora G (2014): Brazilian Flora 2020 project - Projeto Flora do Brasil 2020. v393.147. Instituto de Pesquisas Jardim Botanico do Rio de Janeiro. Dataset/Checklist. doi:10.15468/1mtkaw
              • A Group Brazil Flora, REFLORA Program
              Global Tree Search
              https://tools.bgci.org/global_tree_search.php
              BGCI. 2018. GlobalTreeSearch online database. Botanic Gardens Conservation International. Richmond, U.K. Available at www.bgci.org. Accessed on 30/11/2018.
              • B Botanic Gardens Conservation International
              SolanaceaeSource.org
              http://solanaceaesource.org/
              PBI Solanum Project. 2017. Solanaceae Source. Jan.31st, 2015. http://www.solanaceaesource.org/.
              • C All Rights Reserved
              • D
              • E CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0).
              World Flora Online consortium
              http://www.worldfloraonline.org/organisation/WFO
              World Flora Online Data. 2018.
              • F CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0).