Cerastium L.
  • Sp. Pl. 1: 437. 1753. (1 May 1753)
  • Mouse-ear chickweed, céraiste [Greek, ceras, horn, alluding to shape of capsule]


Cite taxon page as 'WFO (2020): Cerastium L. Published on the Internet;http://www.worldfloraonline.org/taxon/wfo-4000007327. Accessed on: 07 Jun 2020'

General Information

CERASTIUM L.

Cerastium glomeratum Thuill., Fl. Env. Paris, ed. 2, 226. 1799.

Plantas anuales, tallos decumbentes o erectos, muy ramificados en la base, 2.5–30 cm de largo, pilosos. Hojas opuestas, ampliamente elípticas a orbiculares o espatuladas, 5–20 mm de largo y 3–12 mm de ancho, ápice obtuso, pilosas; sin estípulas. Cimas terminales densas, pedicelos 1–5 mm de largo, pilosos, a veces glandulosos; sépalos 5, lanceolados, 2.8–5.1 mm de largo, agudos, margen escarioso, pilosos, generalmente glandulosos; pétalos 5, levemente bilobados, casi tan largos como los sépalos, blancos; estambres 10, más cortos que los pétalos; estilos 5, libres. Cápsula cilíndrica, 5–8.8 mm de largo, sobrepasando al cáliz, curvada, dehiscente por dientes apicales; semillas finamente tuberculadas, 0.3–0.5 mm de diámetro, cafés.

Conocida de Nicaragua por una colección (Williams 24948) de nebliselvas al norte de Santa María de Ostuma, Matagalpa; 1300–1500 m; fr feb; introducida de Europa, ampliamente distribuida en Norteamérica y en las montañas de México y Centroamérica. El nombre Cerastium viscosum L. ha sido usado para esta especie. Se estima que existen entre 60 y 100 especies en el género que es casi cosmopolita. La descripción anterior está basada principalmente en el trabajo de Good.

D.A. Good. A revision of the Mexican and Central American species of Cerastium (Caryophyllaceae). Rhodora 86: 339–379. 1984; R.K. Brummitt. Report of the Committee for Spermatophyta: 49. Taxon 49: 261–278. 2000.

  • Provided by: [G].Flora de Nicaragua
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    Annual or perennial, usually pubescent, erect or decumbent herbs. Leaves opposite, usually sessile or subsessile, exstipulate, often viscid. Flowers few in dichasial cymes, white. Sepals 5, rarely 4, not connate. Petals as many as the sepals, rarely absent, emarginate or 2-cleft, white. Stamens 10, occasionally less; anthers versatile, 2-celled, longitudinally dehiscent; filaments flattened, scarcely if at all connate to form an obscurely glandular annulus. Ovary superior; carpels 5, rarely fewer, with as many distinct styles, the many campylotropous ovules arising from basal or central placentae. Capsule often arcuate (hence the generic name), dehiscing longitudinally into as many deeply emarginate valves as there are styles; seeds numerous, cochleate, usually tuberculate, estrophiolate, the embryo coiled about the perisperm.

  • Provided by: [E].Flora de Panama
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    Herbs, annual, winter annual, or perennial. Taproots slender, perennial taxa often rhizomatous, rooting at nodes. Stems ascending to erect or decumbent, simple or branched, terete. Leaves basally connate, petiolate (basal in some species) or sessile (cauline); blade 1-5-veined, linear or elliptic to broadly ovate, not succulent (except in C. bialynickii, C. regelii, and C. viride), apex acute to obtuse. Inflorescences terminal, open or congested cymes, or flowers solitary, axillary (racemosely arranged in C. axillare); bracts paired, foliaceous or reduced, herbaceous or often with scarious margins. Pedicels erect, sometimes reflexed or hooked at apex in fruit, or flowers sometimes subsessile (C. regelii). Flowers bisexual, occasionally unisexual and pistillate; perianth and androecium hypogynous or weakly perigynous; hypanthium minimal; sepals (4-)5, distinct, green (red-tipped in C. glomeratum and C. pumilum, often violet-tipped in C. alpinum, purple in C. bialynickii, turning pale orange-brown in fruit in C. texanum), elliptic to ovate, 3-12 mm, herbaceous, margins translucent to purplish, scarious, apex acute, acuminate, or obtuse, not hooded; petals (4-)5 or sometimes absent, white (purple tinged in C. pumilum and C. regelii), clawed, blade apex 2-fid 1/ 1/ 2 of length, notched, or emarginate; nectaries at base of filaments opposite sepals; stamens usually 10, sometimes 5 or 8, occasionally 4; filaments distinct, inserted at base of ovary; staminodes absent or 1-4 (via anther abortion), linear; styles (3-)5(-6), clavate to filiform, 0.5-2 mm, glabrous proximally; stigmas (3-)5(-6), subterminal to linear along adaxial surface of styles, roughened to papillate (30×). Capsules oblong or cylindric, usually ± curved, opening by 10, or occasionally 6 or 8, erect or spreading, convolute or revolute teeth, longer than sepals; carpophore absent. Seeds 15-150+, orange to brown, angular-obovate, often with abaxial groove, laterally compressed, papillate-tuberculate, marginal wing absent, appendage absent. x = [9?, 13, 15] 17, 18, 19.

  • Provided by: [H].Flora of North America @ efloras.org
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    Herbs annual or perennial, pubescent and/or glandular pubescent, rarely glabrous. Stems usually caespitose, sometimes slightly woody at base. Leaves ovate, elliptic, or lanceolate. Inflorescence terminal, a dichasial cyme, dense or lax, sometimes flowers solitary. Sepals (4 or)5, free. Petals (4 or)5, sometimes absent, white, apex usually 2-lobed or retuse, rarely entire. Stamens (3 or 5 or)10; nectaries present. Ovary 1-loculed; ovules numerous. Styles 3--5, inserted opposite sepals. Capsule golden yellowish, cylindric, sometimes subequaling but usually exceeding calyx, hard, thin, brittle, dehiscing by 2 × as many teeth as styles; teeth slightly curved, sometimes straight or revolute. Seeds numerous, globose or reniform, compressed, usually tuberculate; embryo annular.

  • Provided by: [C].Flora Of CHina @ efloras.org
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    "As in terminal cymes, or sometimes solitary; sep (4)5; pet (4)5, retuse to bifid or seldom entire, or occasionally wanting; stamens (4–)10; styles (3–)5; capsule usually surpassing the sep, cylindric, membranous, often curved, dehiscent by (6–)10 short apical teeth; seeds numerous, obovate-reniform, dorsally grooved, papillate-tuberculate; low annual or perennial herbs with rather small, opposite, exstipulate lvs. 100, widespread."

  • Provided by: [F].New York Botanical Garden
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    Morphology

    Leaves opposite, sessile or subsessile, flat or rarely subulate, entire, exstipulate.

  • Provided by: [D].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FZ
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    Inflorescences terminal, dichotomous, often umbelliform, occasionally with solitary flowers; bracts herbaceous or with membranous margins.

  • Provided by: [D].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FZ
    • Source: [
    • 4
    • ]. 

    Flowers bisexual, 4-merous or 5-merous.

  • Provided by: [D].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FZ
    • Source: [
    • 4
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    Sepals free with membranous margins.

  • Provided by: [D].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FZ
    • Source: [
    • 4
    • ]. 

    Seeds ± numerous, laterally somewhat flattened, discoid or reniform, granular or verrucose.

  • Provided by: [D].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FZ
    • Source: [
    • 4
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    Stems simple or dichotomously branched.

  • Provided by: [D].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FZ
    • Source: [
    • 4
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    Annual or perennial herbs, rarely small shrubs.

  • Provided by: [D].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FZ
    • Source: [
    • 4
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    Petals white, emarginate or bifid, sometimes absent.

  • Provided by: [D].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FZ
    • Source: [
    • 4
    • ]. 

    Stamens 5 + 5 or fewer by reduction.

  • Provided by: [D].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FZ
    • Source: [
    • 4
    • ]. 

    Ovary multiovulate; styles (3) 4–5, free.

  • Provided by: [D].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FZ
    • Source: [
    • 4
    • ]. 

    Capsule ellipsoid to cylindric, often somewhat curved, longer than the persistent sepals, or rarely as long as the sepals, opening by 6–10 apical, equal, short, erect or revolute teeth.

  • Provided by: [D].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FZ
    • Source: [
    • 4
    • ]. 

    Habit

    herbs

  • Provided by: [E].Flora de Panama
    • Source: [
    • 6
    • ]. 

    Distribution

    Of this weedy cosmopolitan, temperate genus, only one of about fifty species occurs in Panama.

  • Provided by: [E].Flora de Panama
    • Source: [
    • 6
    • ]. 

    Literature

    SELECTED REFERENCES

    Böcher, T. W. 1977. Cerastium alpinum and C. arcticum, a mature polyploid complex. Bot. Not. 130: 303-309. Brysting, A. K. and R. Elven. 2000. The Cerastium alpinum-C. arcticum complex (Caryophyllaceae): Numerical analyses of morphological variation and a taxonomic revision of C. arcticum Lange s.l. Taxon 49: 189-216. Good, D. A. 1984. Revision of the Mexican and Central American species of Cerastium. Rhodora 86: 339-379. Hultén, E. 1956. The Cerastium alpinum complex. A case of world-wide introgressive hybridization. Svensk Bot. Tidsk. 50: 411-495.

  • Provided by: [H].Flora of North America @ efloras.org
    • Source: [
    • 7
    • ]. 

    Included Species

    Other Local Names

    NameLanguageCountry
    Mouse-ear chickweed, céraiste [Greek, ceras, horn, alluding to shape of capsule]

     Information From

    Caryophyllaceae
    World Flora Online Data. 2017.
    • A CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0).
    MBG Floras Images
    http://www.tropicos.org/ImageSearch.aspx
    Flora images. Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed on Jun. 2018.
    • B Missouri Botanical Garden
    Flora Of CHina @ efloras.org
    http://www.efloras.org/flora_page.aspx?flora_id=2
    'Flora of China @ eFloras (2008). Published on the Internet http://www.efloras.org/flora_page.aspx?flora_id=2 [accessed August 2016]' Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, MO & Harvard University Herbaria, Cambridge, MA.
    • C Missouri Botanical Garden
    Plants Of the World Online Portal - FZ
    https://www.kew.org/science/who-we-are-and-what-we-do/strategic-outputs-2020/plants-of-the-world-online
    http://www.plantsoftheworldonline.org/terms-and-conditions
    • D
    Flora de Panama
    http://www.tropicos.org/Project/PAC
    Robert E. Woodson, Jr. and Robert W. Schery Annals of the Missouri Botanical Garden Vol. 67, No. 4 (1980), pp. ii-xxxiii
    • E Missouri Botanical Garden
    New York Botanical Garden
    Descriptions of plants should be attributed to the full citation for each individual article, chapter or book that is the source for each record, which should include the authors of original publication.
    • F Content licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License
    Flora de Nicaragua
    http://www.tropicos.org/projectwebportal.aspx?projectid=7&pagename=Home&langid=66
    WD Stevens, CU Ulloa, A Pool and OM Montiel. Missouri Botanical Garden Press, 2001
    • G Missouri Botanical Garden
    Flora of North America @ efloras.org
    http://www.efloras.org/flora_page.aspx?flora_id=1
    'Flora of North America @ eFloras (2008). Published on the Internet http://www.efloras.org/flora_page.aspx?flora_id=1 [accessed August 2016]' Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, MO & Harvard University Herbaria, Cambridge, MA.
    • H Flora of North America Association
    World Flora Online consortium
    http://www.worldfloraonline.org/organisation/WFO
    World Flora Online Data. 2018.
    • I CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0).