Portulaca L.
  • Sp. Pl. 1: 445. 1753. (1 May 1753)
  • Purslane [Latin portula, little door, in reference to the lid of the capsule]


Cite taxon page as 'WFO (2021): Portulaca L. Published on the Internet;http://www.worldfloraonline.org/taxon/wfo-4000030996. Accessed on: 18 Sep 2021'

General Information

Herbs annual or perennial. Stems prostrate or decumbent; nodes or leaf axils with scales, bristles, and/or hairs, sometimes short and inconspicuous. Leaves alternate or opposite, usually sessile, flat or terete. Inflorescence a terminal head of sessile, solitary or clustered flowers, subtended by an involucre of leaves. Sepals connate at base into tube, persistent but inconspicuous. Petals 4 or 5(-8+), free or shortly connate at base. Stamens 4-100, adnate to base of petals. Ovary half-inferior. Stigma 2-9-lobed. Capsule circumscissile, sessile, globose or nearly so. Seeds mostly glossy black or iridescent gray, less often brown, orbicular-reniform, minute, often tuberculate, without caruncle.

  • Provided by: [F].Flora Of CHina @ efloras.org
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    Herbs, annual (perennial in P. suffrutescens). Roots tuberous, fleshy, fibrous, or small taproots. Stems erect to prostrate, branched, fleshy or suffrutescent; trichomes in inflorescence or stem nodes absent or present, glabrous otherwise. Leaves alternate or subopposite, congested and involucrelike immediately proximal to inflorescence; blade terete, subterete, or flattened. Inflorescences terminal in clusters, or axillary on short branches. Flowers sessile or subsessile, usually open only in sunshine; sepals broadly clasping at base, herbaceous to scarious, falling from top of capsule; petals ephemeral, 5-7, usually distinct, margins usually entire; stamens (4-)6-40(-100); ovary half inferior to inferior, plurilocular proximally to 1-locular distally, placentation free-central; style 1, short, stigmas 3-8(-18). Capsules membranaceous, chartaceous, dehiscence circumscissile. Seeds many, brown to black or gray, reniform to cochleate; seed coat smooth or variously sculptured, granular to stellate-tuberculate or spiny. x = 4, 5, 8, 9.

  • Provided by: [C].Flora of North America @ efloras.org
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    PORTULACA L.

    Hierbas anuales o raramente perennes, carnosas a suculentas. Hojas generalmente alternas, ocasionalmente opuestas, teretes o aplanadas. Inflorescencias de flores solitarias o en glomérulos en los ápices de las ramas, las hojas apicales subyacentes verticiladas y formando un involucro. Sépalos 2, adnados a la base del ovario; pétalos 4–6, generalmente 5, caducos; estambres 6–40; ovario parcialmente ínfero, estilos 3–9, connados en la base. Cápsula circuncísil; semillas numerosas, reniformes o cocleadas, la testa lisa o tuberculada.

    Un género con 40–100 especies en áreas tropicales y cálidas del hemisferio occidental, con una especie agresiva y cosmopolita; 4 especies en Nicaragua. Portulaca grandiflora Hook., nativa de Sudamérica se cultiva frecuentemente como ornamental.

  • Provided by: [J].Flora de Nicaragua
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    Annual or perennial herbs, succulent. Leaves alternate or approximate, terete to plane, often whorled about the flowers; stipules scarious, fimbriate or tufted, sometimes very small, rarely absent. Inflorescence near the stem apex, crowded, the flowers sometimes solitary, yellow to red. Sepals 2, opposite, connate below, the anterior larger than the posterior, usually persistent. Petals 4-6, connate at the base or free, somewhat auto-deliquescent. Stamens 4 to many, inserted at the base of the petals, the filaments often hairy below. Ovary half to wholly inferior, the ovules numerous, the styles 3- to 9-parted, rarely simple. Capsule circumscissile, chartaceous; seeds reniform to cochleate, numerous, the testa smooth or minutely tuberculate.

  • Provided by: [E].Flora de Panama
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    "Sep 2; pet 4–6, commonly 5 (more in double-fld forms); stamens 6– many; ovary partly inferior; styles or style-branches (2)3–several; capsule circumscissile near the middle; seeds many; ours succulent annuals with mostly alternate cauline lvs, the uppermost crowded and forming an involucre to the fls, these sessile or nearly so, solitary or glomerate at the ends of the stem and branches. 100+. mostly warm reg."

  • Provided by: [I].New York Botanical Garden
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    Morphology

    Leaves shortly petiolate or sessile, opposite or alternate, fleshy, cylindric or plane, glabrous (at least in our species); stipules divided into numerous hairs or more rarely membranous or absent.

  • Provided by: [G].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FZ
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    Annual, biennial or perennial herbs; branches erect or often prostrate.

  • Provided by: [G].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FZ
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    Stamens 4 — c. 100, inserted on the corolla or at its base.

  • Provided by: [G].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FZ
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    Petals 4–5 (6), fugacious, free or ± united, marcescent and enfolding the ripe capsule.

  • Provided by: [G].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FZ
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    Sepals 2, unequal, the larger slightly enfolding the margins of the smaller, connate into a tube below, which is adnate to the base of the capsule.

  • Provided by: [G].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FZ
    • Source: [
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    Flowers sessile, solitary or a few together at the ends of the branches and surrounded by a group of 2-several apical leaves.

  • Provided by: [G].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FZ
    • Source: [
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    Seeds 1-?, usually reniform, smooth or variously tuberculate or granulate.

  • Provided by: [G].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FZ
    • Source: [
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    Capsule dehiscing transversely.

  • Provided by: [G].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FZ
    • Source: [
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    Ovary semi-inferior, 1-locular, at least in the upper part; placentation free central; ovules many or very rarely 1 or several; style simple with 2-several stigmas.

  • Provided by: [G].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FZ
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    Sepals ovate-triangular, basally connate, hooded

  • Provided by: [D].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FTEA
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    Inflorescence terminal though sometimes overtopped by subsequent growth; peduncle expanded into a flat platform bearing one or more sessile flowers and bordered by a circlet of involucral leaves, or inflorescence rarely an open cyme (1 species in East Africa); involucral bracts enclosing woolly hairs and sometimes triangular scales; flowers fugacious, developing in succession

  • Provided by: [D].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FTEA
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    Leaves alternate or opposite, fleshy, linear to obovate, shortly petiolate, caducous, often absent at flowering time; axillary hairs and scales present, these sometimes conspicuously encircling the nodes and overlapping the leaves

  • Provided by: [D].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FTEA
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    Succulent annual or perennial herbs or infrequently shrublets; stems articulated or not; roots sometimes tuberous

  • Provided by: [D].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FTEA
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    Ovary semi-inferior, multi-ovulate; style usually elongate and disarticulating at maturity; stigma branched, the branches recurving

  • Provided by: [D].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FTEA
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    Capsule circumscissile, basal portion rim-like to infundibuliform, membranous to coriaceous, persistent, the dome-shaped top usually cartilaginous, brittle, forming a lid carrying the persistent collapsed perianth

  • Provided by: [D].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FTEA
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    Seeds many, grey, brown or black (immature seeds brown), sometimes iridescent with a metallic sheen, reniform to rounded, smooth or often ornamented with tubercles or pegs.

  • Provided by: [D].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FTEA
    • Source: [
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    Petals 4–5(–6), adnate basally to the sepals, varying slightly in width

  • Provided by: [D].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FTEA
    • Source: [
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    Stamens several to numerous, adherent to the petals in a single whorl, filaments connate basally

  • Provided by: [D].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FTEA
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    Herbes'annuelles ou vivaces, charnues, parfois lignifiées à la base.'Tiges'souvent ± couchées.'Feuilles'charnues, souvent cylindriques, à stipules membraneuses ou plus souvent divisées en poils ± abondants formant des touffes aux aisselles.'Fleurs'sessiles, solitaires ou en petit groupe à l'extrémité des tiges et entourées de quelques feuilles formant un involucre; bractées involucrales inégales, l'une recouvrant l'autre par ses bords; périgone pétaloïde, à 4-6 segments fugaces et fragiles, se réduisant à rien après l'anthèse et par dessiccation; étamines 4-40; ovaire semi-infère, de 4-5 (8) carpelles et style divisé en autant de stigmates; ovules nombreux.'Capsule'à déhiscence transversale (pyxide).'Graines nombreuses, à tégument orné de dessins ou de verrues.\n\t\t\t\tPlus de 100 espèces de régions chaudes, surtout américaines; une trentaine sont connues pour l'Afrique équatoriale orientale, dont 5 seulement ont été observées au Congo belge. Quelques-unes sont parfois cultivées comme ornementales ou consommées en légumes (Pourpier).\n\t\t\t\tLeurs fleurs, qui pour chaque espèce s'ouvrent à un moment assez précis de la journée, se fanent après quelques heures (« fleurs d'un jour » des Espagnols).

  • Provided by: [H].Flore d'Afrique Centrale
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    Habit

    herbs

  • Provided by: [E].Flora de Panama
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    Distribution

    A cosmopolitan genus in tropical and subtropical areas of the world, about 125 species.

  • Provided by: [E].Flora de Panama
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    Literature

    SELECTED REFERENCES

    Legrand, C. D. 1962. Las especies Americanas de Portulaca. Anales Mus. Hist. Nat. Montevideo, ser. 2, 7: 1-147. Matthews, J. F. and P. A. Levins. 1985. The genus Portulaca in the southeastern United States. Castanea 50: 96-104. Walters, S. M. 1964. Portulaca. In: T. G. Tutin et al., eds. 1964-1980. Flora Europaea. 5 vols. Cambridge. Vol. 1, p. 114. Wilson, P. 1932b. Portulaca. In: N. L. Britton et al., eds. 1905+. North American Flora.... 47+ vols. New York. Vol. 21, pp 328-336.

  • Provided by: [C].Flora of North America @ efloras.org
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    Included Species

    Other Local Names

    NameLanguageCountry
    Purslane [Latin portula, little door, in reference to the lid of the capsule]

      Bibliography

     Information From

    MBG Floras Images
    http://www.tropicos.org/ImageSearch.aspx
    Flora images. Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed on Jun. 2018.
    • A Missouri Botanical Garden
    • B Missouri Botanical Garden
    Flora of North America @ efloras.org
    http://www.efloras.org/flora_page.aspx?flora_id=1
    'Flora of North America @ eFloras (2008). Published on the Internet http://www.efloras.org/flora_page.aspx?flora_id=1 [accessed August 2016]' Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, MO & Harvard University Herbaria, Cambridge, MA.
    • C Flora of North America Association
    Plants Of the World Online Portal - FTEA
    https://www.kew.org/science/who-we-are-and-what-we-do/strategic-outputs-2020/plants-of-the-world-online
    http://www.plantsoftheworldonline.org/terms-and-conditions
    • D
    Flora de Panama
    http://www.tropicos.org/Project/PAC
    Robert E. Woodson, Jr. and Robert W. Schery Annals of the Missouri Botanical Garden Vol. 67, No. 4 (1980), pp. ii-xxxiii
    • E Missouri Botanical Garden
    Flora Of CHina @ efloras.org
    http://www.efloras.org/flora_page.aspx?flora_id=2
    'Flora of China @ eFloras (2008). Published on the Internet http://www.efloras.org/flora_page.aspx?flora_id=2 [accessed August 2016]' Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, MO & Harvard University Herbaria, Cambridge, MA.
    • F Missouri Botanical Garden
    Plants Of the World Online Portal - FZ
    https://www.kew.org/science/who-we-are-and-what-we-do/strategic-outputs-2020/plants-of-the-world-online
    http://www.plantsoftheworldonline.org/terms-and-conditions
    • G
    Flore d'Afrique Centrale
    https://www.floredafriquecentrale.be
    • H http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)
    New York Botanical Garden
    Descriptions of plants should be attributed to the full citation for each individual article, chapter or book that is the source for each record, which should include the authors of original publication.
    • I Content licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License
    Flora de Nicaragua
    http://www.tropicos.org/projectwebportal.aspx?projectid=7&pagename=Home&langid=66
    WD Stevens, CU Ulloa, A Pool and OM Montiel. Missouri Botanical Garden Press, 2001
    • J Missouri Botanical Garden
    Portulacaceae
    • K CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0).
    World Flora Online consortium
    http://www.worldfloraonline.org/organisation/WFO
    World Flora Online Data. 2018.
    • L CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0).