Prunus L.
  • Sp. Pl. 1: 473. 1753. (1 May 1753)
  • Plum, cherry, prunier, cerisier [Greek Prunum, plum]


Cite taxon page as 'WFO (2020): Prunus L. Published on the Internet;http://www.worldfloraonline.org/taxon/wfo-4000031284. Accessed on: 27 Nov 2020'

General Information

Trees or shrubs, deciduous. Branchlets sometimes spine-tipped. Axillary winter bud solitary, ovoid; terminal winter bud absent. Stipules membranous, soon caducous. Leaves simple, alternate, convolute [or conduplicate] when young; petiolate or sessile; petiole apex or base of leaf blade margin with or without nectaries; leaf blade margin variously crenate or coarsely serrate. Inflorescences apparently axillary, solitary or to 3-flowered in a fascicle; bracts small, soon caducous. Flowers opening before or at same time as leaves. Hypanthium campanulate. Sepals 5, imbricate. Petals 5, white, sometimes purple-veined, rarely greenish, inserted on rim of hypanthium, imbricate. Stamens 20–30, in 2 whorls; filaments unequal. Carpel 1; ovary superior, 1-loculed, glabrous or sometimes villous; ovules 2, collateral, pendulous. Style terminal, elongated. Fruit a drupe, glabrous, often glaucous, usually with a longitudinal groove; mesocarp fleshy, not splitting when ripe; endocarp laterally compressed, smooth, rarely grooved or rugose.

  • Provided by: [F].Flora Of CHina @ efloras.org
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    Shrubs or trees, sometimes forming clonal thickets, 1–400 dm, glabrous or hairy. Stems 1–20+; bark reddish, reddish brown, gray-brown, or dark gray; long and short shoots usually present; thorns present or absent. Leaves deciduous or persistent, cauline; stipules caducous, linear to lanceolate, margins toothed to lobed, usually glandular; petiole present or absent, ?usually glandular near blade?; blade elliptic, oblong, suborbiculate, ovate, lanceolate, linear, obovate, oblanceolate, spatulate, fan-shaped, or rhombic, seldom folded along midribs, 0.5–18 cm, membranous to leathery, margins flat, usually entire or toothed, sometimes undulate, ?teeth usually glandular, sometimes eglandular?. Inflorescences terminal ?on short shoots or from axils of previous year’s leaves?, 1–64(–90)[–100]-flowered, racemes, corymbs, umbellate fascicles, 2-flowered fascicles, or solitary; bracts sometimes present; bracteoles present. Pedicels usually present, sometimes absent. Flowers usually bisexual, sometimes unisexual (then plants usually dioecious, sometimes andropolygamous), blooming before or at leaf emergence, 4–40 mm diam.; hypanthium 1.5–8 mm, exterior glabrous or hairy; sepals 5, erect to reflexed, usually triangular, semicircular, ovate, or oblong, rarely ovate-elliptic, lanceolate, or obovate; petals 5(–50+ in doubled ornamentals), usually white to pink or dark pink, sometimes yellowish, usually suborbiculate to elliptic or obovate, sometimes oblong, rarely ovate, oblanceolate, or rhombic, ?base usually clawed?; stamens 10–30, usually shorter than or equal to petals, sometimes longer. Drupes 1, greenish yellow to yellowish or orange to bright or dark red, reddish brown, or dark purple to black, globose to ovoid, ovoid-oblong, ellipsoid, or obovoid, 5–30(–80) mm; hypanthium deciduous, rarely persistent in fruit; sepals falling with hypanthium; ?mesocarps usually fleshy, sometimes leathery to dry, rarely splitting along suture to reveal stone; endocarps forming globose to ovoid or ellipsoid to fusiform stones, sometimes flattened laterally?. Seed 1. x = 8.

  • Provided by: [D].Flora of North America @ efloras.org
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    15. Prunus L.

    Amygdalopsis M. Roem., Amygdalus L., Armeniaca Scop., Cerasus Mill., Emplectocladus Torr., Lauro-cerasus Tourn. ex Duhamel, Microcerasus Webb et Berthel., Padus Mill., Persica Mill., Prunophora Neck., Pygeum Gaertn.

    Por J.A. Pérez-Zabala.

    Árboles, arbustos o subarbustos deciduos, semideciduos o siempreverdes, algunas veces armados. Extensiones vegetativas (ramitas) glabras o pubescentes, generalmente lenticeladas, con crecimiento estacional produciendo unidades de extensión estacionales de diversa longitud; yemas glabras o pubérulas cubiertas con catafilos ovados o deltoides, frecuentemente trilobados y con una línea de tricomas ventralmente en el área de inserción con el tallo; ramas vegetativas y fértiles nuevas algunas veces con hojas transicionales (catafilos transicionales) trilobadas hacia la base. Hojas simples, alternas, con los márgenes enteros, serrados, o dentados, la nervadura generalmente broquidódroma, a veces eucamptódroma, las nervaduras secundarias a veces formando domacios en la intersección con la vena media; glándulas foliares superficiales casi siempre presentes, laminares, marginales o peciolares, generalmente en pares desde uno hasta numerosos; generalmente pecioladas; estípulas por lo general tempranamente caducas, subuladas hasta ampliamente foliáceas. Flores dispuestas sobre ramas especializadas (ramas florales), emergiendo axialmente sobre ramas cortas (braquiblastos) o regulares, generalmente racemosas, a veces ramificadas basalmente o con el eje comprimido con apariencia de umbelas o fascículos, o reducidas a 1 sola flor; brácteas basales similares a los catafilos, deciduas tempranamente. Flores casi siempre hermafroditas, aunque algunas veces con el pistilo reducido y no funcional; brácteas generalmente deciduas tempranamente; bractéolas algunas veces presentes; hipanto generalmente bien desarrollado; sépalos generalmente deltoides o lingüiformes, valvares; pétalos 5(10), generalmente blancos, a veces amarillos, rosados o verdosos, insertados en los márgenes del hipanto, libres, quincunciales, membranosos, desde orbiculares hasta espatulados con la base angosta, a veces de apariencia sepaloide; estambres 10-20(-85), en 1-varias series, los filamentos filiformes, libres, las anteras frecuentemente glabras, dorsifijas; pistilo con estilo terminal, el ovario súpero, 1-carpelar, insertado en la base del hipanto, con 2 óvulos por carpelo, generalmente solo uno se desarrolla, hemiepítropos con 1 o 2 obturadores adyacentes al micrópilo, el estigma capitado hasta discoide. Frutos en drupas, monospermas, rara vez dispermas, con una cicatriz longitudinal

  • Provided by: [H].Flora Mesoamericana
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    PRUNUS L.

    Arboles o arbustos, a veces espinosos. Hojas alternas, simples, comúnmente serradas. Flores en fascículos o racimos, blancas o rosadas; pétalos insertos en la garganta del hipanto; estambres 5–20, insertos en la garganta del hipanto; carpelo 1. Fruto una drupa con pulpa jugosa, hueso duro; semilla 1.

    Género con ca 200 especies en zonas templadas y tropicales de Europa, Asia y las Américas; 1 especie nativa y otra cultivada se han colectado en Nicaragua y otra se espera encontrar.

  • Provided by: [J].Flora de Nicaragua
    • Source: [
    • 8
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    Trees with alternate simple leaves. Flowers (in Panamanian species) white, racemose; calyx 5-lobed, the tube perigynous, cup-like, forming with the receptac- ular disk the hypanthium bearing the 15-20 stamens and 5 petals at its margin; filaments free, filiform or somewhat dilated at base; carpel 1, with terminal style and peltate or truncate stigma; ovules 2, collateral. Fruit a drupe, one-seeded, often with juicy pulp.

  • Provided by: [E].Flora de Panama
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    "Hypanthium cup-shaped, obconic, or urceolate; sep spreading or reflexed, usually soon deciduous; pet 5, white to pink or red, elliptic to obovate, spreading; stamens ca 20; pistil 1, simple, 2-ovulate, inserted at the bottom of the hypanthium and bearing a terminal style; fr a 1-seeded drupe, the exocarp fleshy or juicy, the endocarp (stone) hard; trees or shrubs with simple, serrate lvs, very often with a pair of large glands at the summit of the petiole, the fls conspicuous, umbellate or solitary from axillary buds or short lateral branches, or racemose and terminal; bark commonly with conspicuous horizontal lenticels, relatively smooth, or breaking up into smooth platelets. (Amygdalus, Cerasus, Padus) 200, mainly N. Temp."

  • Provided by: [G].New York Botanical Garden
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    Morphology

    Calyx-tube obconic, campanulate, cyathiform or tubular; calyx-lobes imbricate.

  • Provided by: [I].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FZ
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    Petals inserted at the mouth of the calyx-tube, or absent.

  • Provided by: [I].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FZ
    • Source: [
    • 4
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    Stamens 10–8, inserted with the petals; filaments filiform, free.

  • Provided by: [I].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FZ
    • Source: [
    • 4
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    Trees or shrubs, sometimes spiny.

  • Provided by: [I].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FZ
    • Source: [
    • 4
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    Leaves alternate, deciduous or persistent, simple, entire or incised; stipules small, caducous.

  • Provided by: [I].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FZ
    • Source: [
    • 4
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    Flowers usually bisexual, solitary or fasciculate-corymbose or in racemes, sometimes precocious.

  • Provided by: [I].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FZ
    • Source: [
    • 4
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    Perianth usually biseriate and 5-merous, sometimes irregularly so.

  • Provided by: [I].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FZ
    • Source: [
    • 4
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    Carpel 1, style terminal, stigma peltate, capitate or truncate; ovules 2, collateral.

  • Provided by: [I].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FZ
    • Source: [
    • 4
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    Fruit drupaceous, fleshy or dry, indehiscent, 1- or rarely 2-seeded.

  • Provided by: [I].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FZ
    • Source: [
    • 4
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    Habit

    Trees

  • Provided by: [E].Flora de Panama
    • Source: [
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    Literature

    SELECTED REFERENCES Bortiri, E. et al. 2001. Phylogeny and systematics of Prunus (Rosaceae) as determined by sequence analysis of ITS and the chloroplast trnL-trnF spacer DNA. Syst. Bot. 26: 797–807. Bortiri, E. et al. 2002. The phylogenetic utility of nucleotide sequences of sorbitol 6-phosphate dehydrogenase in Prunus (Rosaceae). Amer. J. Bot. 89: 1697–1708. Bortiri, E., B. Vanden Heuvel, and D. Potter. 2006. Phylogenetic analysis of morphology in Prunus reveals extensive homoplasy. Pl. Syst. Evol. 259: 53–71. Hedrick, U. P. 1911. The Plums of New York. Albany. Lee, S. and J. Wen. 2001. A phylogenetic analysis of Prunus and the Amygdaloideae (Rosaceae) using ITS sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA. Amer. J. Bot. 88: 150–160. Mason, S. C. 1913. The pubescent-fruited species of Prunus of the southwestern states. J. Agric. Res. 1: 147–178. McVaugh, R. 1951. A revision of the North American black cherries (Prunus serotina Ehrh., and relatives). Brittonia 7: 279–315. Shaw, J. and R. L. Small. 2005. Chloroplast DNA phylogeny and phylogeography of the North American plums (Prunus subgenus Prunus section Prunocerasus, Rosaceae). Amer. J. Bot. 92: 2011–2030. Wight, W. F. 1915. Native American species of Prunus. Bull. U.S.D.A. 179: 1–75.

  • Provided by: [D].Flora of North America @ efloras.org
    • Source: [
    • 6
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    Included Species

    Other Local Names

    NameLanguageCountry
    Plum, cherry, prunier, cerisier [Greek Prunum, plum]

     Information From

    MBG Floras Images
    http://www.tropicos.org/ImageSearch.aspx
    Flora images. Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed on Jun. 2018.
    • A Missouri Botanical Garden
    • B Missouri Botanical Garden
    • C Missouri Botanical Garden
    Flora of North America @ efloras.org
    http://www.efloras.org/flora_page.aspx?flora_id=1
    'Flora of North America @ eFloras (2008). Published on the Internet http://www.efloras.org/flora_page.aspx?flora_id=1 [accessed August 2016]' Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, MO & Harvard University Herbaria, Cambridge, MA.
    • D Flora of North America Association
    Flora de Panama
    http://www.tropicos.org/Project/PAC
    Robert E. Woodson, Jr. and Robert W. Schery Annals of the Missouri Botanical Garden Vol. 67, No. 4 (1980), pp. ii-xxxiii
    • E Missouri Botanical Garden
    Flora Of CHina @ efloras.org
    http://www.efloras.org/flora_page.aspx?flora_id=2
    'Flora of China @ eFloras (2008). Published on the Internet http://www.efloras.org/flora_page.aspx?flora_id=2 [accessed August 2016]' Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, MO & Harvard University Herbaria, Cambridge, MA.
    • F Missouri Botanical Garden
    New York Botanical Garden
    Descriptions of plants should be attributed to the full citation for each individual article, chapter or book that is the source for each record, which should include the authors of original publication.
    • G Content licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License
    Flora Mesoamericana
    http://www.mobot.org/MOBOT/fm/
    Gerrit Davidse, Mario Sousa Sánchez, A. O. Chater, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. Instituto de Biología, Missouri Botanical Garden, Natural History Museum (London, England) UNAM, 1994
    • H Missouri Botanical Garden
    Plants Of the World Online Portal - FZ
    https://www.kew.org/science/who-we-are-and-what-we-do/strategic-outputs-2020/plants-of-the-world-online
    http://www.plantsoftheworldonline.org/terms-and-conditions
    • I
    Flora de Nicaragua
    http://www.tropicos.org/projectwebportal.aspx?projectid=7&pagename=Home&langid=66
    WD Stevens, CU Ulloa, A Pool and OM Montiel. Missouri Botanical Garden Press, 2001
    • J Missouri Botanical Garden
    Rosaceae
    CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0). https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0
    • K CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0).
    World Flora Online consortium
    http://www.worldfloraonline.org/organisation/WFO
    World Flora Online Data. 2018.
    • L CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0).