Rumex L.
  • Sp. Pl. 1: 333. 1753. (1 May 1753)
  • Dock, sorrel [classical Latin name for sorrel, probably derived from rumo, to suck, alluding to the practice among Romans of sucking the leaves to allay thirst]


Cite taxon page as 'WFO (2021): Rumex L. Published on the Internet;http://www.worldfloraonline.org/taxon/wfo-4000033616. Accessed on: 26 Sep 2021'

General Information

Herbs perennial or less commonly annual, rarely shrubs, rarely dioecious. Roots usually stout (taproots), or sometimes plants rhizomatous. Stems erect, rarely ascending to prostrate, branched, not hollow or sulcate. Leaves simple, often dimorphic, fugacious or persisting, basal and cauline, alternate, margin entire or undulate; ocrea tubular, membranous, margin entire. Inflorescence usually terminal, sometimes terminal and axillary, racemose or paniculate. Pedicel articulate (the functional pedicel consists of the true pedicel and, below the joint, the narrowed united basal parts of the outer tepals (pseudopedicel)). Flowers bisexual or unisexual (unisexual in dioecious, and rarely in polygamo-monoecious plants). Perianth persistent, tepals 6, becoming enlarged and often hardened in fruit; valve (fruiting inner tepal) margin entire, erose, denticulate, or variously dentate, midvein often transformed into tubercles (tuberculate callosities). Stamens 6. Styles 3, elongate; stigmas penicillate. Achenes trigonous, elliptic to ovate.

  • Provided by: [G].Flora Of CHina @ efloras.org
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    RUMEX L.

    Rumex crispus L., Sp. Pl. 335. 1753.

    Hierbas perennes hasta 1 m de alto, glabras; plantas dioicas o poligamodioicas. Hojas inferiores oblongas a oblongo-lanceoladas, 15–30 cm de largo, y 4–7 cm de ancho, hojas superiores angostamente oblongas o lanceoladas, 7–15 cm de largo, ápice acuminado o agudo, base cordada u obtusa, margen undulado o crispado; pecíolos 4–10 cm de largo; ócreas frágiles, caducas. Panícula abierta, flores laxamente verticiladas; pedicelos en fruto articulados, el doble de largo de las alas del cáliz, alas cordadas, 3–4 mm de largo, truncadas o emarginadas en la base, eroso-dentadas en los márgenes o raramente enteras, cada una con una callosidad. Aquenio 2 mm de largo, 3-angulado, los ángulos generalmente marginados, café obscuro.

    Común, ruderal de áreas alteradas, zona norcentral; 1100–1500 m; fl ene, ago, sep, fr probablemente todo el año; Croat 42956; Stevens 10158; nativa de Europa y ampliamente distribuida en el Nuevo Mundo. En sentido amplio es un género cosmopolita con 300 especies. Dos especies adicionales que son malezas cosmopolitas se podrían encontrar en Nicaragua: R. acetosellus L. con hojas hastadas en la base y R. obtusifolius L. con hojas arrosetadas, oblongas, cordadas en la base.

  • Provided by: [F].Flora de Nicaragua
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    Flowers perfect or unisexual, pedicellate, few to many in verticillate ochreolate fascicles. Perianth of 6 tepals, the outer 3 usually smaller and spreading or reflexed, the inner 3 cordate, entire or lacerate, frequently with an abaxial tubercle, usually accrescent and closely investing the achene. Stamens 6, discrete, the filaments usually shorter than the anthers, the anthers mostly 2-locular and loculicidal. Ovary trigonous with 3 spreading to reflexed filiform styles capped by fimbrillate peltate stigmata. Achene triquetrous, smooth and lustrous or rough and dull, usually included. Glabrous usually perennial herbs, occasionally becoming quite tall and shrubby. Leaves alternate, entire or rarely dentate, occasionally tending to form rosettes, the ochreae hyaline and rather tardily deciduous.

  • Provided by: [B].Flora de Panama
    • Source: [
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    Herbs, perennial, biennial, or annual, synoecious (subg. Rumex and Platypodium) or dioecious (subg. Acetosa and Acetosella), occasionally polygamomonoecious, with taproots and usually short caudex, or sometimes rhizomatous and/or stoloniferous. Stems erect, ascending, or prostrate, glabrous or papillose-pubescent. Leaves basal (in some species) and cauline, alternate, petiolate; ocrea persistent or partially deciduous, membranous; petioles present on basal and proximal cauline leaves, absent on distal cauline leaves, bases not articulated; blades variable in shape, basal (if present) and proximal cauline leaves from broadly ovate or almost orbiculate to linear, becoming progressively smaller and narrower distally, margins entire (or basally lobate), flat, or occasionally undulate or crisped. Inflorescences terminal, sometimes terminal and axillary, paniclelike, rarely simple. Pedicels present. Flowers bisexual or unisexual, (1-)4-30 per ocreate fascicle, base stipelike; perianth green, pinkish, or red, campanulate, glabrous; tepals (5-)6, connate proximally, sepaloid, dimorphic, outer 3 remaining small, inner 3 usually enlarging, sometimes 1-3 with central vein transformed into tuberculate callosity (tubercle); stamens 6; filaments distinct, free, glabrous; anthers, yellow to brownish yellow, ovate to elongate; styles 3, spreading or reflexed, distinct; stigmas 3, fimbriate or plumose. Achenes included in accrescent and usually veiny perianth, tan to dark brown, unwinged to weakly winged, 3-gonous, sometimes compressed-3-gonous or nearly pyramidal, glabrous. Seeds: embryo straight. x = 7, 8, 9, 10 (polyploidy widespread in the genus).

  • Provided by: [I].Flora of North America @ efloras.org
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    "Fls perfect or unisexual; tep 3 ± 3, the outer usually narrower at anthesis; stamens 6, on short filaments; ovary trigonous; styles 3, spreading or deflexed over the angles of the ovary, each with a branched, stellate stigma; achene trigonous, closely invested by the accrescent inner tep; our spp. herbs, usually coarse; lvs subtended by sheathing stipules; fls small, greenish or suffused with red, in small verticils aggregated into a compound infl. At maturity the inner tep are called valves; often the midrib of a valve enlarges into an evident protuberance called a grain or tubercle. Our spp. all fl in summer and fr in late summer and fall. 200, widespread."

  • Provided by: [E].New York Botanical Garden
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    Morphology

    Leaves alternate.

  • Provided by: [D].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FZ
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    Annual, biennial or perennial herbs, more rarely shrubs, climbing or not, usually with long stout taproots, sometimes rhizomatous.

  • Provided by: [D].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FZ
    • Source: [
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    Nut sharply trigonous, with a woody pericarp, surrounded by the inner accrescent perianth segments.

  • Provided by: [D].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FZ
    • Source: [
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    Flowers hermaphrodite or unisexual, pedicellate, arranged in whorls borne in racemes or panicles.

  • Provided by: [D].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FZ
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    Perianth 6-merous, in 2 whorls of 3; outer perianth segments small and thin; inner segments accrescent, becoming enlarged and usually hardened in fruit, ovate or triangular, often reticulate-veined, with the margin entire, wavy or toothed, with or without dorsal tubercles on the midrib near the base.

  • Provided by: [D].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FZ
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    Stamens 6, in 2 whorls of 3; anthers basifixed.

  • Provided by: [D].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FZ
    • Source: [
    • 11
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    Ovary trigonous; styles 3; stigmas 3, penicillate or fimbriate.

  • Provided by: [D].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FZ
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    Ocrea membranous, entire or lacerate.

  • Provided by: [D].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FZ
    • Source: [
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    Bracteoles 1 or 0

  • Provided by: [C].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FTEA
    • Source: [
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    Hermaphrodite or dioecious, usually glabrous herbs, often stout

  • Provided by: [C].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FTEA
    • Source: [
    • 12
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    Stamens 6, inserted at the base of the perianth

  • Provided by: [C].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FTEA
    • Source: [
    • 12
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    Tepals 6, in two series of 3; the outer small, non-accrescent; the inner accrescent, erect, circular, ovate or triangular with the margin entire, wavy or toothed, sometimes winged, and the midrib sometimes swollen to produce a wart-like tubercle

  • Provided by: [C].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FTEA
    • Source: [
    • 12
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    Styles 3; stigmas penicillate or fimbriate.

  • Provided by: [C].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FTEA
    • Source: [
    • 12
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    Nuts trigonous, enclosed within the inner tepals

  • Provided by: [C].Plants Of the World Online Portal - FTEA
    • Source: [
    • 12
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    Plantes'herbacées, annuelles ou vivaces, parfois suffrutescentes à frutescentes, quelquefois monoïques ou dioïques.'Feuilles'alternes, à ochréa membraneuse et fugace.'Inflorescences'en panicules racémeuses ou ramifiées.'Fleurs'☿ ou ♂ ♀, disposées en glomérules, pédicellées et à pédicelle articulé; bractéole 1 ou absente; périgone verdâtre, en 2 verticilles 3-mères, à tépales intérieurs accrescents après la floraison en forme de valves membraneuses ou coriaces à maturité et munies ou non d'un granule à la base; étamines 6, disposées en groupes de 2, à filets filiformes et à anthères oblongues; ovaire trigone, 1-loculaire et 1-ovulé; styles 3, courts, libres ou soudés aux angles de l'ovaire et à stigmates pénicillés.'Akènes trigones, enveloppés par les valves et à albumen uni.\n\t\t\t\tGenre boréal, renfermant environ 130 espèces, largement répandues surtout dans les régions tempérées du globe. La plupart des espèces sont très polymorphes et fort difficiles à définir.

  • Provided by: [H].Flore d'Afrique Centrale
    • Source: [
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    Distribution

    Of this large predominantly temperate genus, only two species, both probably naturalized from Europe, are thus far represented in the flora of Panama.

  • Provided by: [B].Flora de Panama
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    Literature

    SELECTED REFERENCES

    Löve, Á. and B. M. Kapoor. 1968. A chromosome atlas of the collective genus Rumex. Cytologia 32: 328-342. Rechinger, K. H. 1937. The North American species of Rumex. (Vorarbeiten zu einer Monographie der Gattung Rumex 5.) Publ. Field Mus. Nat. Hist., Bot. Ser. 17: 1-150. Rechinger, K. H. 1949. Rumices Asiatici. (Vorarbeiten zu einer Monographie der Gattung Rumex 7.) Candollea 12: 9-152. Tolmatchew, A. I. 1966. Rumex. In: A. I. Tolmatchew, ed. 1960-1987. Flora Arctica URSS. 10 vols. Moscow and Leningrad. Vol. 5, pp. 143-161. Trelease, W. 1892. A revision of the American species of Rumex occurring north of Mexico. Rep. (Annual) Missouri Bot. Gard. 3: 74-98. Tzvelev, N. N. 1989b. Rumex, Acetosella, Acetosa. In: S. S. Kharkevich, ed. 1985+. Plantae Vasculares Orientis Extremi Sovetici. 7+ vols. Leningrad. Vol. 4, pp. 29-53.

  • Provided by: [I].Flora of North America @ efloras.org
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    Included Species

    Other Local Names

    NameLanguageCountry
    Dock, sorrel [classical Latin name for sorrel, probably derived from rumo, to suck, alluding to the practice among Romans of sucking the leaves to allay thirst]

     Information From

    MBG Floras Images
    http://www.tropicos.org/ImageSearch.aspx
    Flora images. Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed on Jun. 2018.
    • A Missouri Botanical Garden
    Flora de Panama
    http://www.tropicos.org/Project/PAC
    Robert E. Woodson, Jr. and Robert W. Schery Annals of the Missouri Botanical Garden Vol. 67, No. 4 (1980), pp. ii-xxxiii
    • B Missouri Botanical Garden
    Plants Of the World Online Portal - FTEA
    https://www.kew.org/science/who-we-are-and-what-we-do/strategic-outputs-2020/plants-of-the-world-online
    http://www.plantsoftheworldonline.org/terms-and-conditions
    • C
    Plants Of the World Online Portal - FZ
    https://www.kew.org/science/who-we-are-and-what-we-do/strategic-outputs-2020/plants-of-the-world-online
    http://www.plantsoftheworldonline.org/terms-and-conditions
    • D
    New York Botanical Garden
    Descriptions of plants should be attributed to the full citation for each individual article, chapter or book that is the source for each record, which should include the authors of original publication.
    • E Content licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License
    Flora de Nicaragua
    http://www.tropicos.org/projectwebportal.aspx?projectid=7&pagename=Home&langid=66
    WD Stevens, CU Ulloa, A Pool and OM Montiel. Missouri Botanical Garden Press, 2001
    • F Missouri Botanical Garden
    Flora Of CHina @ efloras.org
    http://www.efloras.org/flora_page.aspx?flora_id=2
    'Flora of China @ eFloras (2008). Published on the Internet http://www.efloras.org/flora_page.aspx?flora_id=2 [accessed August 2016]' Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, MO & Harvard University Herbaria, Cambridge, MA.
    • G Missouri Botanical Garden
    Flore d'Afrique Centrale
    https://www.floredafriquecentrale.be
    • H http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)
    Flora of North America @ efloras.org
    http://www.efloras.org/flora_page.aspx?flora_id=1
    'Flora of North America @ eFloras (2008). Published on the Internet http://www.efloras.org/flora_page.aspx?flora_id=1 [accessed August 2016]' Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, MO & Harvard University Herbaria, Cambridge, MA.
    • I Flora of North America Association
    Polygonaceae
    World Flora Online Data. 2017.
    • J CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0).
    World Flora Online consortium
    http://www.worldfloraonline.org/organisation/WFO
    World Flora Online Data. 2018.
    • K CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0).